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Newcomers to Hawaii

Hawaii Interpreting Services (HIS) receives many inquiries from people curious about work criteria, the interpreting and Deaf communities, and general island-life information.  Beyond the information on the Interpreters/Captioners page, the information below may be helpful. The greatest concentration of Deaf consumers and interpreters is on the island of Oahu, near the capital Honolulu. Most interpreting work is also here in Honolulu, however, there is a greater need for interpreters on the other islands. The downside is that jobs are sometimes scarce on those islands.

There are times when there are more requests than available interpreters, and there are times when requests are few and far between. As with any profession, the interpreters with the greatest skill will always be in highest demand. The Disability and Communication Access Board provides a recommended fee schedule for interpreters under Hawaii Administrative Rules Title 11 Chapter 218. K-12 Educational Interpreters are hired directly by the State of Hawaii.

Here are some links you may also find helpful.

General Information – The State of Hawaii maintains a Hawaii Newcomer’s Guide with Demographic Information, Voting Registration, and other useful links. Hawaii Newcomers Guide

Cost of Living - The Honolulu Star Advertiser printed an article "CNBC report says Hawaii's cost of living highest in nation" on July 15, 2013. CNBC report says Hawaii's cost of living highest in nation

Things to Know when Moving to Hawaii - Royal Hawaiian Movers posts some helpful tips on moving to Hawaii including good times to move and other considerations. Things to Know when Moving to Hawaii

General Excise Tax – Business operators, including service professionals like interpreters, are required to have a General Excise Tax license. General Excise Tax Information FAQ

Rates – In Hawaii, the Disability and Communication Access Board maintains a recommended fee schedule for interpreters (HAR Title 11 Chapter 218.) Disability and Communication Access Board

RID – The Hawaii Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf posted an article "Live and Work in Hawaii" with a few language tips. Live and Work in Hawaii